UK Alcohol guidelines were plucked out of thin air.

Yes its true. the guidlines that are constantly thrown at you the the nanny state and its supporters have no scientific basis at all!

The safe limits guidelines were introduced in 1987 after the Royal College of Physicians produced its first health report on alcohol misuse. In A Great and Growing Evil: The Medical Consequences of Alcohol Abuse, the college warned that a host of medical problems – including liver disease, strokes, heart disease, brain disease and infertility – were associated with excessive drinking. The report was supposedly the most significant study into alcohol-related disorders to date.

But Richard Smith, the former editor of the British Medical Journal and a member of the college’s working party on alcohol, told The Times in October 2007 that the figures were not based on any clear evidence. He remembers “rather vividly” what happened when the discussion came round to whether the group should recommend safe limits for men and women.

“David Barker was the epidemiologist on the committee and his line was that ‘We don’t really have any decent data whatsoever. It’s impossible to say what’s safe and what isn’t’.

“And other people said, ‘Well, that’s not much use. If somebody comes to see you and says ‘What can I safely drink?’, you can’t say ‘Well, we’ve no evidence. Come back in 20 years and we’ll let you know’. So the feeling was that we ought to come up with something. So those limits were really plucked out of the air. They weren’t really based on any firm evidence at all. It was a sort of intelligent guess by a committee.”

Subsequent full scientific studies have found evidence which suggested that the safety limits should actually be raised, but they were ignored by a succession of health ministers because they were off-message.

Mark Goldrich, director of Euromarque Personalised Wines Ltd said “As ever, if Politicians are involved, you can’t believe anything that is said. Its enough to drive you to drink!”

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